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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
's education. people say that federal loans have card caps of $5,000-$7,000 per year. you can only borrow a total of $33,000 for undergrad. but that is not looking at the parent portion of the picture. the parent portion allows you to borrow as much as you need, to fill the unmet need, to pay your child's way to get to a particular school. there is a credit check that is very modest and there is not a check on income. but as costs have grown, perhaps the limits we have had on federal student loans do not meet the needs the students and families are experiencing when they are trying to pay for college. you see the growth in the program where more parents are borrowing from this program. recipients have doubled in the past decade, and they are borrowing more money as well. we thought it was emblematic of the shift in the system. >> would you say the apparent lack of paycheck is one of the most consistent missing pieces? if someone has an income of $10,000 a year, they can take out a loan for $30,000. >> if they do not have a negative credit history, and we could have a larger conversation a
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
regarding their voting records and actions in regard to, say, equity in education and access to health care and fiar pay. and i actually have to say i link the fairness and focus on just this in regard to domestic issues and international issues. i do not apply those values just to u.s. citizens but to apply the same desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether the source is a religion or their own sense of morality which they probably borrowed from other religions, how can you not consider morality and believes when you are voting? otherwise, you are simply pushing a lever b
. the degree to which the library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drive it to be candid the fundraising ability that john brings to this. john, thank you for your work and thank you for the introduction. [applause] i hope all of you will join calista and me in keeping mrs. rage anyone your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime working for this country. we cherish role while she continues to play a role here in the library. i couldn't come here without mentioning nancy for a minute. governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from you being mayor in san diego, to u.s. senator and leader in a variety of ways. i look to them as great people who represent a willingness to serve their state and country. an important way, and i want to say it's a family engagement out there. thank you both for serving the country. it makes a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i didn't know you would be with us. we're thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched wha
founders were not so foolish as to suppose that freedom can thrive or survive without appropriate education and nourishments of character. they understood this must mean education broadly understood to include not just schools, but all the institutions of civil society that explain freedom and equip citizens with the virtues freedom requires. these virtues includes self- control, modernization. these reinforce the rationality essential to human happiness. notice when madison like the founding father's generally spoke of human nature, he was not speaking as modern progressives do as manage inconstant, something evolving, something constantly formed and reformedly changing social and other historical forces. when people today speak of nature, they generally speak of flora and trees and animals and other things not human. but the founders spoke of nature as a guide to and as a measure of human action. they thought of nature not as something merely to be manipulated for human convenience but rather as a source of norms to be discovered. they understood that natural rights could not be asserted,
by this incredible will that he had and nursed for education. -- thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that your. -- year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 19641965. he opposed martial -- in 1964 and 1965. he oppose richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues that result on civil rights -- you got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd that's on the le
to respond to the aspirations of people for jobs, housing, health care, retirement security and the education of their children. we are still there, yet we're still pursuing wars abroad and doing military buildups. this is the direction america is going, and it is the wrong direction. >> congressman, your colleagues, your republican colleagues in the house have a different perspective. speaking on fox news, mike mulvaney of south carolina blamed the democratic-led senate for the impasse in negotiations on the so-called fiscal cliff while speaking on fox news. >> the house has extended these tax rates for everybody in the entire country, which is exactly the correct policy as we see it. the senate has refused to take it up. the senate could fix it today if they wanted to. but interest in while harry reid is in the well today and the senate complaining about mr. boehner, he has not this -- is not scheduled a discussion today on the fiscal cliff, which is absurd rid the house has done its job in the senate could fix this today if they wanted to. >> that was mike mulvaney of south carolina. >> it
prevention. we also believe parents need to be educating their kids and talking to kids about appropriate sexual behaviors to assure all of the young people in philadelphia are prepared when they think about having sex for the first time. we believe that our role is to assure that as partners for parents, we provide what young people may need if they're going to act responsibly in terms of sexual relations. >> you talk about education and i just want to throw out numbers. 25% of new hiv infections in philadelphia alone are teenagers. 15% of philadelphia students say they weren't taught about hiv or aids in school. some might argue maybe more education might be the answer, not condoms. >> we don't think it's one or the other. we think most are important. we're including education not only in schools but also include the internet and we're providing condoms as we've been doing now for more than a year in a number of locations throughout the city for young people. >> let's talk a little bit about the program. tell me a little bit about how it will work, because the part that i sort of took t
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has ground. n.ese are -- has grown a these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for its. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and yo
anticipated, when women get education, access to birth control and some autonomy over their lives and bodies, the birth rate really falls off the cliff. in mexico it's amazing how quickly it's happened. >> and hispanic-americans, right? >> yes, in the u.s. as well. and then there's the question of climate. can we, if we keep putting carbon in the atmosphere, and we can only put a fifth of the carbon and hope to make temperatures which i harp on all the time -- >> two degrees celsius, there's a lot that we have to leave in the ground. christian, how do you think about how compatible our models of growth are with avoiding climate disaster? >> well, you know, the limits of growth had two areas. one is that they were running out of resources and running out of sinks. we have found more oil, we find more resources. they have been correct in terms of the earth capacity to absorb pollution. >> what does sink mean? >> a place to put the ability to absorb -- >> the ocean has absorbed enormous amounts of c02. they were right about the plilis of the earth's ability to absorb this. but there's a problem
and neither highly educate and both of them made a very good living, but as a twist, when we look at labor, we have to look at how inclusive the labor unions are, and how much they advocate for people across race and gender, and we have to look at the strategy of labor unions in terms of is it about broadening the numbers of people who are participating in unios s or it is about protecting the interest of the feem who already have union membership? that is a critical case where when you talk about expanding the role of unions, you have to also talk about expanding the ranks of unions, because that is sometimes going to cut against the grain of cheollective bargaining rank for existing members, so without overcomplicating the things, we have to be aware that the overall percentage of american workers who have been unionized is slhrinking in part because o the destabilization of the market that is not educated. >> and the role of the union is a way to go broad and deep. and lord knows that the best paying jobs have nothing to do with having a ph.d. and stay right, there because we want to stay i
the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united stat
to educate the american public that this math we're on in terms of spending is unsustainable. >> you say leadership and i hear anti-democratic betrayal. >> i'm serious. it's like one person's leadership is another person's bait and switch. right? >> potato/potatop. >> we know that the issue in terms of cost in this country is health care. we know that the medicare premiums, medicare expenditures in this country are not something that we can continue to sustain. there's a fix, everybody won't be happy with the fix but we could get to policy prescription that solves the problem. politics in and around that that makes it extremely difficult. >> you did some unpopular things when you were governor. you raised taxes and you got absolutely hammered for it. what's you're feeling about it? >> leadership entails the need for somebody to appreciate the fact that no answer is easy. there are no easy answers anymore. the willingness to compromise off of that is leader ship. when you have a group of people in the house on the house of representatives that represents the strange ones at the right end,
the gang problem or gun problem in chicago. law enforcement is not going to fix the educational system or the poverty rate or any of those other things. >> get closer to home now. it's starting to get late, boys. >> reporter: one thing we noticed on our ride-along, the amount of children on the streets after dark. 34 kids have been killed in the violence this year alone, including 7-year-old heaven sutton, who was shot in the head while selling candy in her front yard. >> juveniles are the ones getting shot. we got to get them home. that's where the parents can help us a lot. >> quite frankly, we need the parents to step up a little built more and take ownership, sincerely of their children, and raise them a little bit better. >> stay here. >> reporter: at one point, they pull over two men driving a car with illegal tail pipes. >> got a license? >> reporter: they approach with caution and get them out you. they end up being clean. no gang tattoos, just two young men out trying to have a good time. the men may feel like they're being harassed. they say it's a part of the job. >> overall
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
or ourselves, then we're going to be held accountable. we have a program that's focused on education. it's on discipline. and when people don't meet the standard of the nfl, we're going to take action. there are consequences for that. >> what do you worry about the most? >> i worry about player health and safety. that's the number one challenge and focus. we want to keep our athletes safe and also athletes not just football or in the nfl, but every level. and efvery other sport. >> television coverage makes it attractive to watch at home rather than the stadium. is it a problem for the owners? >> it's a challenge for us. watching it in high-definition super slow-mo is a great experience. that's gotting to change. our challenge is how do we make sure that that same kind of experience happens in the stadium, so we're bringing technology into the stadium. we're working harder to making sure that the fans feel safe. they have to have a great experience. >> you wrote a famous letter which i have talked to you about before. written to your father. and you said two thing, i
know her. the michelle obama who loves being first lady. she is a very very intelligent, well-educated, well spoken woman with a great opinion and a strong opinion but who also has a reputation kerned for liking the very comfortable lifestyle and here in the white house she has people taking care of her every want and wish. she as you know has gone on many many vacations, some of them quite controversial to spain and the ski slopes in the western united states. she's been at one point during the period of several months, 42 days on vacation. she is living the life of a very pampered woman and apparently this fits with her personality. >> you right, where's the clintons were open and above horrid about their co-presidency posting that hillary was an equal partner with bill, the obamas have been careful to hide the fact that michelle is the president's most important political adviser and the one he listens to above all others before he makes decisions. >> yes and i think that's so true. the way she does that is often through her very best friend, how she gets her opinions through. her
cnn's 2009 hero of year for bringing education it to mani manila's street children through mobile push cart classrooms. he hopes to be an inspiration it to others. >> i'm representing the street children to give them hope. >> he's one special boy. you may remember one of the 2011 nominees for the children's peace prize, malala yousufzai for supporting educational rights. she's still recovering from that attack in a british hospital. >>> his film bringing the santa claus, the sandeman and easter bunny to life on the big screen. we're talk to the director of "the rise of the guardians." when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s and dot our "i"s, we still run into problems -- mainly other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto p
a right to an education. >> i will get my education if it is in home, school or anyplace. >> the taliban retaliated, hunting her down, shooting her in the neck and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis and all around the world, malala quickly became a symbol of good against evil. today she's recovering in england. number one. president obama. >> tonight you voted for action, not politics as usual. >> after a long and we mean long and bitter campaign, president obama won re-election. in 2012, the president also won the supreme court stamp of approval for his health care reform program and made history with this statement. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 2012 comes to a
in philadelphia are teenagers. not getting the education for one reason or another and they say this will help. parents, of course, some of them see it differently. >> i will keep my mouth shut. wait until the interview, hear what the guy has to say. >>> the power of the media helped get a stolen pooch back to its family. just finishing up the paperwork to adopt the chihuahua mix on saturday when someone stole him on saturday. the alarm sounded on social media over the weekend and by monday, got a tip that broke the case. >> folks in oregon care deeply about pets, and the social media pressure was outstanding, so i think when they realized they had a hot puppy, so to speak, they were eager to return him to the shelter. >> he was in my arms when i first met him, and he is there again now, so it's good. >> so what happened? we don't really know. the pup doesn't seem to care much. no arrests so far. >> it looks just like your chihuahua, drew. >> it sure does. >> on the plane last night. >>> walk if yrning if you are traveling. there could be heavy snow to the north and severe weather to the south
the country, parents understandably are scared. educators are concerned about security in schools. let's go to utah where the teachers will be getting weapons training today. and arizona's attorney general plans to have trained or principal trained with a gun inside the school. basically they're not saying they want the teachers to go roaming the halls with a gun. but this is like the last standr classroom. >> clayton: the first response are how are they going to allow guns in utah. in utah, one of the few states that allows guns in public schools, the legislature there had that state's rights, that's how they've done it for years. what the school says to your point, we don't want them roaming the halls, but it's free. we're going to waive a $50 fee on training so if you want to learn how to hold a gun, concealed weapons holder, get more training. the argument from gun advocates is they're much more able to quickly respond should some mad man come into a school than police having a swat team get there five, six, seven minutes later. >> kelly: the same thing holds true for arizona. i know wh
the congressional hearings and the stuff about the educational stuff, all the policy-making situations. thatnk it's a great thing washington d.c. has all these things and c-span covers it. >> eric want to c-span on comcast. created by america's cable companies in 1979, run to you as a public-service by your television provider. >> "washington journal" continues. host: randal o'toole is a senior fellow at the cato institute in washington and is the author of this book on how government undermines the dream of home ownership. thanks for being with us. >> good morning. glad to be here. host: how does the government affect homeowners buying a home? guest: 45% of american housing is in states and urban areas that have severe land-use restrictions, urban growth boundaries to prevent urban sprawl. they have other kinds of restrictions such as onerous permitting processes that it takes up to five years to get a permit to build up to one house. that makes it very hard for builders to meet demand for housing. when that happens, housing prices become very expensive. homeownership rates dropped. the federal
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
. >> that is educational. >> zarf, quickly. >> it's this. >>> all right. jonathan is an 11-year-old drummer, enjoys exploring the p p percussive sounds of household appliances. check this out. okay. so he's 10 years old when he posted the video in september. he's taken drum lessons but says he's basically self-taught. he thinks the washing machine is easier to play than his own drum kit. sounds like a college marching band. he's really good. >> you want to demo? who's really good at percussion? you play the guitar. >> i've done enough in this segment to embarrass myself. i think we should do phil collins "in the air tonight" drum solo. >> while they do that, i'm going to tell you that up next we've got five ways to actually keep your new year's resolution in 2013 right after this. this family used capital one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actually use... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bells, doesn't it? my gift to you! the capital one venture card! for any flight, an
amendment, advocating the right to keep and bear arms, advancing gun safety, education, and training and creating an answer to freedom's call and we are growing stronger every day. we are the nra and the and are a. nra. host: those of the words of senator joe manchin who is a gun advocate. we're taking your calls and comments -- will it be a bitter fight ahead? we go to the democrats' line from macon, georgia. caller: how many children are we going to lose to guns before something is done? i remember during the 08 election, there were people around the president of the united states with assault rifles. we put people in schools with the guns, what happens if there in the restroom and somebody breaks and from the front? how are they going to protect the children? how many children do we have to lose? host: thanks for the call -- let me share with you this photograph from "the new york daily news." a handful of students tried to flee and lanza shot teem. some of the other fallen students are in the photograph. because of the teacher process protection, most of her students survived a c
put him in the back of a sweltering car. now the russian foreign minister, the education minister are against this new bill. it seems they may not have a lot of sway, though, because president putin is, in fact, expected to sign this thing relatively soon. gregg: all right. so much for pair troika and glass northeast. thanks very much, trace. >> reporter: sure. heather: just days until taxes are set to up on almost every american, the president -- this is nice of him, to cut his vacation short, get back to work -- well, he is planning to keep that from happening. that's not the only thing on his plate. ed henry ahead with those details. gregg: and as some rare winter weather tears the roofs off homes down south, we're going to get an update on the devastation in the devastated areas in the south. it's amazing you got back. heather: i know. i got back to prove you wrong,. gregg. gregg: there you go. >> oh, my god, look, that's a tornado. oh, wow. oh, jesus, look at that tornado. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover
dumbs. they talk about the economy, jobs, the climate, education and things that matter and they don't use the kind of language that we use in our campaign because they're scared or turn off the voters in the middle. at the center that since we don't like mandatory anything now come to be a champion of the mega millions lottery where your ticket is your voting stock of coming and if you look at the last mega millions where people camped out three days in advance to be given to get a ticket where of course let's face it the chance of winning was less than being struck by lightning twice in a day put a few hundred million dollars into this and we will up their turnout significantly. i think they are an easier way to move in a direction and a lot of things can be done. we have to do some changes in the system including the filibuster. >> can i add a word? >> i fifa to questions go to get their. how to make it better and isn't it the public's fault after dhaka? i think they fit very well together. if you have a mismatch, if you have ideologically polarized parties operating in a separati
education whether it's how our criminal justice system functions. repass the light of judgment and would organize an powerful and often destructive ways based on simple binary calculations. we have a whole criminal justice system right now that's all too comfortable with targeting young, black men regardless of the rainbow of colors they represent. as long as we see that they are black is good enough. there is a fluidity here than in some ways some unlike adolphus is able to exploit. what i read in the story as whites could read that too. someone should the lineage whether they want to embrace it or not. i wanted to finish with two things. one, you describe in very powerful language the onset of jim crow and it made me think about reconstruction and see. that perhaps we don't talk enough about because it is this moment of tremendous achievement for that first generation of formerly enslaved people. you describe the tens of thousands of people in south carolina are disenfranchised by new sets of law, but just a de
. eliminate. eliminate the jurching food. you can't have junk food in the house to teach them . educate the kids and tell them why it is important to eat well . teach them about good eating and what is good about the veg tannels and be smarter and have more energy. >> i find myself doing it with the milk. you are talking about the calcium and the teeth . i participate and thrameeps parents also -- respiratory >> it is not involved and not eating fruits and vegetables. >> and exercise is so important. you say to add to the daily routine. you talk about tech gifts . you got to get outside and run around. >> tike bite-sized pieces of the you can't expect a parent to go home and exercise with my child for an hour. you take five or 10 minutes and walk the dog and getting outside in the cold weather is a beautiful thing. people tend to stay inside. get outside and walk the dog and play with the ball or inside, do sit am've ups and push ups with the children. it is not unreasonable. it is mommy me time and daddy time with the kids. >> i saw a couple of jumping jacks . improve their emotional h
hearing the screaming and shooting over the school's loud speakers. it also says the board of education failed to provide a safe school setting or emergency response plan. in all, 26 people, including 20 children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set ever
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)